Latin Commentaries on Revelation

Ancient Christian Texts

by Victorinus of Petovium, Apringius of Beja, Caesarius of Arles, and Bede the Venerable
Edited and Translated by William C. Weinrich
Series Editor Thomas C. Oden and Gerald L. Bray

Latin Commentaries on Revelation
hardcover
  • Length: 201 pages
  • Published: November 2011
  •  In stock
  • ISBN: 978-0-8308-2909-5
  • Item Code: 2909
  • Case Quantity: 10

Interest in the book of Revelation in the Western tradition is stronger and earlier than that in the East. The earliest full commentary on the Apocalypse is that of Victorinus of Petovium written in the mid to late third century by the earliest exegete to write in Latin. Victorinus interpreted Revelation in millennialist terms, a mode of interpretation already evident in works by Irenaeus, as well as in modest allegorical terms.

Caesarius of Arles wrote in the early sixth century and offered a thoroughgoing allegorical-ecclesial interpretation of the Apocalypse. Apringius of Beja in Portugal, writing in the mid sixth century, drew on Jerome's edition of Victorinus's commentary yet understood the seven seals christologically as the incarnation, birth, passion, death, resurrection, glory and kingdom.

Bede the Venerable, who died in 735, is the last commentator to be included in this collection. Characteristically, he passes on commentary from earlier exegetes, here including that of Augustine, Gregory the Great, Victorinus, Tyconius and Primasius.

William Weinrich renders a particular service to readers interested in ancient commentary on the Apocalypse by drawing together these significant Latin commentaries. The work of translating these texts was begun in preparing the volume on Revelation in the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture. We are indebted to William Weinrich for completing this work with his able and fresh translation and notes on these texts.

"This is an excellent contribution to a much-needed series, which, along with Weinrich's companion volume on the Greek commentaries of Oecumenius and Andreas of Caesarea, makes available to a wider readership the diversity and rich sophistication of early exegesis of Revelation. Revelation scholars will profit immensely from the interpretive possibilities explored by their ancient predecessors."

Ian K. Boxall, Journal for the Study of the New Testament, 35(5)
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CONTENTS

General Introduction
Abbreviations
Translator?s Introduction

Victorinus of Petovium
Commentary on the Apocalypse
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Six
Chapter Seven
Chapter Eight
Chapter Nine
Chapter Ten
Chapter Eleven
Chapter Twelve
Chapters Thirteen and Seventeen
Chapter Fourteen and Seventeen
Chapter Nineteen
Chapter Twenty
Chapter Twenty-one

Apringius of Beja
Explanation of the Revelation by the Most Learned Man, Apringius, Bishop of Pax [Julia]
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Eigheen
Chapter Nineteen
Chapter Twenty
Chapter Twenty-one
Chapter Twenty-two

Caesarius of Arles
Exposition on the Apocalypse
Exposition on the Revelation of Saint John
The Continuation of the Exposition of the Revelation (Homily 2)
Again, a Continuation of the Revelation (Homily 3)
A Continuation of the Revelation (Homily 4)
The Continuation (Homily 5)
The Continuation (Homily 6)
The Continuation (Homily 7)
The Continuation (Homily 8)
The Continuation (Homily 9)
The Continuation (Homily 10)
The Continuation (Homily 11)
The Continuation (Homily 12)
The Continuation (Homily 13)
The Continuation (Homily 14)
The Continuation (Homily 15)
The Continuation (Homily 16)
The Continuation (Homily 17)
The Continuation (Homily 18)
The Continuation (Homily 19)

Bede the Venerable
The Exposition of the Apocalypse by Bede the Presbyter
A Versicle of Bede the Elder
Prefatory Letter to Eusebius
Book One
Book Two
Book Three

Scripture Index

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